Food Photography Tips

These food photography tips are designed to show you how easy it is to get going in this rapidly growing field. One of the great things about food photography is that you have complete control over the set-up and you don't need any fancy lighting or specialist camera equipment to get going.

1. When photographing food, keep the composition simple and avoid too many props - always keep the food as the main element.

2. Professional food photographers usually work with a food stylist but if you decide to work on your own consider purchasing a good book on the topic.


3. A small amount of food on a plate is visually more interesting than a large amount

4. Use tooth-picks and skewers to create interesting structures

5. Use a plant spray to moisten the food and make it look fresh

6. White plates show the food off best but bold, solid colours can create great contrasts with the food colours - your choice!

7. Coloured serviettes (napkins) can add a nice splash of colour to an all-white set-up

8. Food photography lighting set-ups needn't cost anyting at all and in fact food shots usually look best when created with natural light

9. Use a sunny window or shoot out of doors in preference to using flash.

10. Shoot midday or early afternoon - south or west facing windows are best

11. If the light is too strong, use wax paper to diffuse it

12. Use a large sheet of white card or foam-board to reflect light into the shadow areas

13. Try keeping the food in focus and the background out of focus - experiment with different f-stops to achieve the desired effect

14. Work quickly as the visual appeal of food wanes quickly once it is on the plate

I hope these food photography tips inspire you to get started. The art of photographing food is easy to learn and you can start off with a really simple set up in your own home. I hope you have a lot of fun!

P.S. If you are interested in doing the food styling yourself, there are some great books on the subject on Amazon. Check them out by following the link. Or follow this link if you want to read more food photography tips.



› Food Photography Tips


Top of Page